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Soho Press
289 pages
Product Description
<b>A studio executive leaves his family and travels the world giving free reign to the bipolar disorder he's been forced to hide for 20 years.</b><br><br>"Juliann Garey writes with stark, lucid power about the tumbling journey into madness and the agonizing climb back out."--<b>Brian Yorkey</b>, book and lyrics for <i>Next to Normal</i><br><br>In her tour-de-force first novel, Juliann Garey takes us inside the restless mind, ravaged heart, and anguished soul of Greyson Todd—a successful Hollywood studio executive who leaves his wife and young daughter for a decade to travel the world, giving free reign to the bipolar disorder he’s been forced to keep hidden for almost 20 years. The novel intricately weaves together three timelines: the story of Greyson’s travels (Rome, Israel, Santiago, Thailand, Uganda); the progressive unraveling of his own father seen through Greyson’s childhood eyes; and the intricacies and estrangements of his marriage. The entire narrative unfolds in the time it takes him undergo twelve 30-second electroshock treatments in a New York psychiatric ward.
Soho Press
289 pages
Amazon.com Review
<strong>Amazon Best Books of the Month, December 2012</strong>: Debut novelist Juliann Garey channels movie studio exec Greyson Todd’s spiral into madness with the intimacy of memoir. Punctuated by electroshock treatments that dampen Greyson's extremes at the expense of his sense of self, <i>Too Bright to Hear Too Loud to See</i> maps his memories before and since his mother’s death threw his mind for a perpetual loop. Greyson's roaring mania has an upside: It spawns a lust for risks that reward him richly in Hollywood. But as the highs give way to immobilizing lows that become impossible to hide, he leaves his wife and daughter and disappears into the Israeli outback, then Nairobi, Bangkok, and eventually New York, where everyone is “impatient and irritable and agitated,” so he fits right in. Deep cash reserves allow Greyson to indulge the urges brought on by full-blown bipolar disorder for a good decade before he lands in a psych ward, and his exploits take on spectacularly lavish, absurd proportions, but you’ll laugh through gritted teeth. And though you may not ever like him, you’ll know his pain well enough to be grateful for every grain of sanity he regains. <i>--Mari Malcolm</i>