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Delacorte Press
400 pages
Product Description
<p>#1 <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author Brandon Sanderson, coauthor of Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time series and creator of the internationally bestselling Mistborn Trilogy, presents <u>Steelheart</u><i>,</i> the first book in the Reckoners series, an action-packed thrill ride that will leave readers breathless. <br><br>Ten years ago, Calamity came. It was a burst in the sky that gave ordinary men and women extraordinary powers. The awed public started calling them Epics.<br><br>But Epics are no friend of man. With incredible gifts came the desire to rule. And to rule man you must crush his will. <br><br>Nobody fights the Epics . . . nobody but the Reckoners. A shadowy group of ordinary humans, they spend their lives studying Epics, finding their weaknesses, and then assassinating them.<br><br>And David wants in. He wants Steelheart—the Epic who is said to be invincible. The Epic who killed David's father. For years, like the Reckoners, David's been studying, and planning—and he has something they need. Not an object, but an experience. <br><br>He's seen Steelheart bleed. And he wants revenge.</p><p>[<b>Star</b>] “Snappy dialogue, bizarre plot twists, high intensity action, and a touch of mystery and romance; it’s a formula that sucks readers into the prologue, slings them through one tension-filled encounter after the other, and then...leaves them panting for the sequel.”—<b><i>Booklist</i></b><br> <b> </b><br> “The near-constant action, Sanderson’s whiz-bang imaginings, and a fully realized sense of danger… make this an absolute page-turner.”—<b><i>Publisher’s Weekly</i></b><br>  <br> “Perfect for genre fans who love exciting adventure stories with surprising plot twists.”—<b><i>School Library Journal</i></b><br> <b><i> </i></b><br> “A straight-up Marvel Comics–style action drama featuring a small band of human assassins taking on costumed, superpowered supervillains with melodramatic monikers.”—<b><i>Kirkus Reviews</i></b><br>  <br> “Fantastic! The suspense is relentless and the climax explosive, with a resolution that I’ll be thinking about for a long time.” —James Dashner, <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author of the Maze Runner series and <u>The Eye of Minds</u><br>  <br> “Unfortunately for my ego, Steelheart is another win for Sanderson, proving that he’s not a brilliant writer of epic fantasy, he’s simply a brilliant writer. Period.” —Patrick Rothfuss, author of the <i>New York Times</i> and <i>USA Today</i> bestseller <u>The Name of the Wind</u></p>
Delacorte Press
400 pages
Amazon.com Review
<div class="aplus"> <h4>Q&A with Brandon Sanderson (Interviewed by James Dashner)</h4> <div class="rightImage" style="width: 300px;"><img src="http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/RANDO/EMS/APLUS/SteelheartSandersonQAPhotoR.jpg" alt="Mary C. Neal" width="300" height="225" /></div> <p><strong>Q. Brandon, you’re perhaps best known for your adult books—<em>Mistborn</em>, <em>The Way of Kings</em>, and particularly for finishing Robert Jordan’s <em>The Wheel of Time</em> series. However, recently you’ve undertaken several projects for younger readers. Why is that? How does it feel to be entering into the world of YA fiction? How does it differ from writing for an adult audience? How do you possibly think you can compete with your friend, James Dashner?</strong></p> <p>A. I've known this guy James Dashner for so long, and he was such an inspiration to me, and I thought, if this joker can do it, then I can too! The sci-fi/fantasy genre is what made a reader out of me, and it has a long history of crossing the line between YA and adult fiction. For example, you mentioned The Wheel of Time. In the early books, the main protagonists are all teenagers. Are these books YA? The publishers don't classify them that way. They’re shelved with the adult fantasy books. Books like that have influenced me in that some of the stories I tell fit into the mold that society says will package well as YA books. Other stories I tell—that are a thousand pages long—don’t seem to fit that mold. But I don’t sit down and say, “I’m writing for a teen audience now. I need to change my entire style.” Instead, I say, “This project and the way I’m writing it feels like it would work well for a teen audience.”</p> <p><strong>Q. In previous interviews, you’ve mentioned that you come up with characters, worlds, and magic systems independently and then fit them together to create a book. How is that different when writing a YA book like <em>Steelheart</em>? Are certain worlds or magic systems more suitable for YA readers? And how in the world did you get so smart?</strong></p> <p>A. Ha! I do a lot of talking about the process of writing. That makes it sound like I’m doing it more consciously than I am, but at this point I do most of it by instinct. I do take things like characters, settings, and magic systems—all these little fragments and pieces—and put them together into stories. Whether I’m writing YA or adult, this process doesn’t vary. Some of these elements feel better suited for a teen audience, so when everything starts coming together as it does when a book is forming for me, some stories naturally gravitate toward YA. To me Steelheart is distinctive because it was one of those stories where all the elements came together at the same time. Once I got the idea—people gaining super powers but only evil people getting them—the story basically started to write itself in my head. It happened during a four-hour drive along the East Coast, where by the end of it, I basically had this entire story. I knew where it was going, and I was really excited to write it. That's rare for me, but sometimes it does happen where everything clicks right at the beginning.</p> <p><strong>Q. Can you give us a sense of the world in which <em>Steelheart</em> takes place? Why do you think this world worked well for these particular characters?</strong></p> <p>A. Technically, <em>Steelheart</em> is set in a post-apocalyptic world where super villains gained powers and took over. I wanted it to feel alien and familiar at the same time and to be very visual. So I wrote it to be kind of like an action movie in book form. One of my catchphrases that I use when talking about writing is ”Err on the side of awesomeness.” So I wanted the setting and feel of the book to be visually distinctive and awesome.</p> <p>When I designed <em>Steelheart</em>, the emperor of Chicago, I wanted him to have the power of transmutation—he turns things into steel. The idea that, in a burst of power, he turned the entire city—and even part of the lake—into steel was fascinating to me. This renders a lot of things useless. When your streetlights and all their wiring have been turned into steel, everything short circuits and doesn’t work anymore. You can’t get into buildings because their doors and windows have been melded together. The whole city has become a shell—like the husk of a dead beetle—and people have built on top of it. It’s always perpetual twilight there, so we’ve got this cool feel of everything being steel at night. </p> </div>