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Vintage
480 pages
Amazon.com Review
The opening pages of a Haruki Murakami novel can be like the view out an airplane window onto tarmac. But at some point between page three and fifteen--it's page thirteen in <I>Kafka On The Shore</I>--the deceptively placid narrative lifts off, and you find yourself breaking through clouds at a tilt, no longer certain where the plane is headed or if the laws of flight even apply. <p> Joining the rich literature of runaways, <I>Kafka On The Shore</I> follows the solitary, self-disciplined schoolboy Kafka Tamura as he hops a bus from Tokyo to the randomly chosen town of Takamatsu, reminding himself at each step that he has to be "the world¹s toughest fifteen-year-old." He finds a secluded private library in which to spend his days--continuing his impressive self-education--and is befriended by a clerk and the mysteriously remote head librarian, Miss Saeki, whom he fantasizes may be his long-lost mother. Meanwhile, in a second, wilder narrative spiral, an elderly Tokyo man named Nakata veers from his calm routine by murdering a stranger. An unforgettable character, beautifully delineated by Murakami, Nakata can speak with cats but cannot read or write, nor explain the forces drawing him toward Takamatsu and the other characters.<p> To say that the fantastic elements of <I>Kafka On The Shore</I> are complicated and never fully resolved is not to suggest that the novel fails. Although it may not live up to Murakami's masterful <I>The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle</I>, Nakata and Kafka's fates keep the reader enthralled to the final pages, and few will complain about the loose threads at the end. <I>--Regina Marler</I>
Vintage
480 pages
Product Description
<i>Kafka on the Shore </i>is powered by two remarkable characters: a teenage boy, Kafka Tamura, who runs away from home either to escape a gruesome oedipal prophecy or to search for his long-missing mother and sister; and an aging simpleton called Nakata, who never recovered from a wartime affliction and now is drawn toward Kafka for reasons that, like the most basic activities of daily life, he cannot fathom.<br> <br>As their paths converge, and the reasons for that convergence become clear, Haruki Murakami enfolds readers in a world where cats talk, fish fall from the sky, and spirits slip out of their bodies to make love or commit murder. <i>Kafka on the Shore</i> displays one of the world’s great storytellers at the peak of his powers.