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Drawn and Quarterly
72 pages
Amazon.com Review
<I>The Freddie Stories</I> is a collection of strips from Lynda Barry's weekly cartoon, <I>Ernie Pook's Comeek</I>. As the title suggests, all the strips feature Freddie, a gentle misfit and self-described "fag" who goes through a wrenching year. Though Barry's drawing style is whimsical and her protagonists are kids, this is definitely not a book for young children. The haunting--and sometimes downright disturbing--stories cover everything from the fluid nature of friendships to special ed. class to arson. Not only do Freddie's peers misunderstand him, his mother is cold and distant and makes no secret of the fact that she dislikes him. Tough odds, but luckily Freddie has his exuberant sister, Marlys, to help him through. Though the bright spots in <I>The Freddie Stories</I> are few and far between, it's a nearly impossible book to put down once you've started it. Barry's young characters are as painfully real as her drawings are hypnotic. <I>--Ali Davis</I>
Drawn and Quarterly
72 pages
Product Description
<P><B>THE TRIALS AND TRIBULATIONS OF TROUBLED ADOLESCENTS FROM BARRY’S ACCLAIMED COMIC</B><BR><BR><I>The Freddie Stories</I> traces a year in the life of Freddie, the youngest member of the dysfunctional Mullen family. These four-panel entries—each representing an episode in the life of Freddie—bring to life adolescence, pimples and all. No matter what happens, it all seems to go wrong for Freddie—he’s set up as an arsonist, mercilessly teased in school, and bossed around by classmates. With consummate skill, Lynda Barry writes about the cruelty of children at this most vulnerable age when the friends they make and the paths they choose can forever change their lives. In <I>The Freddie Stories </I>every word of dialogue, every piece of narration, and every dark line evokes adolescent angst. These short, moving stories are collected from Barry’s beloved <I>Ernie Pook’s Comeek</I>, which was serialized across North America for two decades. Re-packaged here with a brand-new afterword from Lynda Barry, <I>The Freddie Stories </I>is an adult tale about just how hard it is to be a teenager, and it’s classic Barry work—poignant, insightful, and true.