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HarperCollins
232 pages
Product Description
<p style="LINE-HEIGHT: normal; MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><span style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Times New Roman','serif'; FONT-SIZE: 10pt">“A strange, wondrous, challenging, enriching book….Beautiful and powerful…you will not encounter another book like it.”<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p></span></p><p style="LINE-HEIGHT: normal; MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><span style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Times New Roman','serif'; FONT-SIZE: 10pt">—<em>National Review</em> online<o:p></o:p></span></p><p style="LINE-HEIGHT: normal; MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><span style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Times New Roman','serif'; FONT-SIZE: 10pt"><o:p> </o:p></span></p><p style="LINE-HEIGHT: normal; MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt" class=MsoNormal><span style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Times New Roman','serif'; FONT-SIZE: 10pt">In <em>Digital Barbarism, </em>bestselling novelist Mark Helprin (<em>Winter’s Tale, A Soldier of the Great War</em>) offers a ringing Jeffersonian defense of private property in the age of digital culture, with its degradation of thought and language and collectivist bias against the rights of individual creators. A timely, cogent, and important attack on the popular Creative Commons movement, <em>Digital Barbarism </em>provides rational, witty, and supremely wise support for the individual voice and its hard-won legal protections.</span></p>